Natural Resource Management

Natural Resource Management refers to the management of natural resources such as land, water, soil, plants and animals, with a particular focus on how management affects the quality of life for both present and future generations Natural resource management is congruent with the concept of sustainable development, a scientific principle that forms a basis for sustainable global land management and environmental governance to conserve and preserve natural resources. Natural resource management specifically focuses on a scientific and technical understanding of resources and ecology and the life-supporting capacity of those resources. 1] Environmental management is also similar to natural resource management. The Natural resource management emphasis on sustainability can be traced back to early attempts to understand the ecological nature of American rangelands in the late 19th century, and the resource conservationmovement of the same time. [2][3] This type of analysis coalesced in the 20th century with recognition that preservationist conservation strategies had not been effective in halting the decline of natural resources. A more integrated approach was implemented recognising the intertwined social, cultural, economic and political aspects of resource management. 4] A more holistic, national and even global form evolved, culminating in the Brundtland Commission and the advocacy of sustainable development. The most active areas of natural resource management are Wildlife management often associated with Eco-tourism and Rangeland (pastures) management. The Natural resource management emphasis on sustainability can be traced back to early attempts to understand the ecological nature of American rangelands in the late 19th century, and the resource conservation movement of the same time.

This type of analysis coalesced in the 20th century with recognition that preservationist conservation strategies had not been effective in halting the decline of natural resources. A more integrated approach was implemented recognising the intertwined social, cultural, economic and political aspects of resource management. [4] A more holistic, national and even global form evolved, culminating in the Brundtland Commission and the advocacy of sustainable development. The most active areas of natural resource management are Wildlife management often associated with Eco-tourism and Rangeland (pastures) management.