Assignment on Mission Statement

TITLE Many companies formulate a Vision and Mission statement. Explain why companies follow such practices and how they can use them effectively. You will support your arguments through organizational examples to demonstrate how Mission and Vision statements are formulated and describing the programs implemented to support such practices. Table of contents Executive summary……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 Definition of Mission and vision statements……………………………………………………………….. Benefits of Mission statements and vision statements………………………………………………….. 7 Communicated and adopted by the staff:………………………………………………………………………………. 7 Key Principles to Effective Internal Organizational Communications……………………………………. 7 Mission and vision statement implemented through different programs………………………………… 7 Challenges and benefits of mission and vision statements in a constant climate change………….. Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12References………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13 Executive Summary There is no company without mission and vision statements. In any organizations, mission and vision statement can affect thousands of individuals in various ways. Mission and vision statements are one of the most frequently used management tools.

Organizations spend thousands of hours and dollars developing mission and vision statements and then more resources again on public relations to unfold them to their stakeholders. Definition of Mission and vision statements: Mission: Mission statements indicate that the fundamental purpose of a company, an organization or an enterprise, succinctly describing why it exists and what it does to achieve its Vision. The mission statement actually depend on could be either the long term or the short term. A corporate mission can last for many years, or for the life of the organization or may change as the organization develops.

It is not an objective with a timeline, but rather the overall goal that is accomplished as organizational goals and objectives are achieved. Vision: Defines the desired or intended future state of an organization or enterprise in terms of its fundamental objective and/or strategic direction. Vision is a long term view, sometimes describing how the organization would like the world in which it operates to be. For example a charity working with the poor might have a vision statement which read “A world without poverty” Benefits of Mission statements and vision statements

Organizations sometimes summarize goals and objectives into a mission statement and/or a vision statement. Others begin with a vision and mission and use them to formulate goals and objectives. While the existence of a shared mission is extremely useful, many strategy specialists question the requirement for a written mission statement. However, there are many models of strategic planning that start with mission statements, so it is useful to examine them here. A Mission statement tells you the fundamental purpose of the organization. It defines the customer and the critical processes.

It informs you of the desired level of performance. A Vision statement outlines what the organization wants to be, or how it wants the world in which it operates to be. It concentrates on the future. It is a source of inspiration. It provides clear decision-making criteria. An advantage of having a statement is that it creates value for those who get exposed to the statement, and those prospects are managers, employees and sometimes even customers. Statements create a sense of direction and opportunity. They both are an essential part of the strategy-making process.

Many people mistake vision statement for mission statement, and sometimes one is simply used as a longer term version of the other. The Vision should describe why it is important to achieve the Mission. A Vision statement defines the purpose or broader goal for being in existence or in the business and can remain the same for decades if crafted well. A Mission statement is more specific to what the enterprise can achieve itself. Vision should describe what will be achieved in the wider sphere if the organization and others are successful in achieving their individual missions. Communicated and adopted by the staff:

Internal communications is a generic expression for all communication (formal and informal) that an organization undertakes with its close stakeholders — i. e. those people with whom it has a relationship that requires support, principally direct/indirect employees and/or members. The main purpose of formal internal communications is to inform employees or members of the direction and performance of the organization (and/or team) to which they belong. The profession of internal communications builds on fundamental principles of other disciplines like human resources (HR), marketing, project management and media planning.

As a result it often gets adopted in organisations under different labels: employee communications, employee engagement, internal marketing, company communications, staff communication, etc. Responsibility can also reside within different functions: marketing, corporate communications, transformation, HR, CEO office, etc. In common with other communication professions, there are different areas of specialism within internal communications: channel management, speech-writing, change communications, HR communications, project communications, event management, social media, intranets, etc.

Key Principles to Effective Internal Organizational Communications 1. Unless management comprehends and fully supports the premise that organizations must have high degrees of communications (like people needing lots of water), the organization will remain stilted. Too often, management learns the need for communication by having to respond to the lack of it. 2. Effective internal communications start with effective skills in communications, including basic skills in listening, speaking, questioning and sharing feedback (see Communications Skills. These can developed with some concerted review and practice.

Perhaps the most important outcome from these skills is conveying that you value hearing from others and their hearing from you. 3. Sound meeting management skills go a long way toward ensuring effective communications, too. (Guidelines for Effective Meeting Management. ) 4. A key ingredient to developing effective communications in any organization is each person taking responsibility to assert when they don’t understand a communication or to suggest when and how someone could communicate more effectively. Mission and vision statement implemented through different programs: There are various programs stated below: To communicate the direction of the organization. •To help make day-to-day operating decisions. •To keep the organization focused. •To motivate employees. Many authors have a variety of beliefs of what should be included in a mission statement. Ireland and Hill (1992) state that the mission statement should include the organizations goals, purpose, product and market scope and philosophical views. Davies and Glaister (1997) believe that it should include the organizations statement of purpose and inspirational view for the future.

While Jamieson and Justice (1999) state that the framework for the development of a mission statement should begin with the organizations primary purpose, target market, core products or services, critical values and measures of success. One of the better practical definitions has been provided by Bartkus, Glassman and McAfee (2000) who basically state a mission statement is a statement to communicate a description of the firm to its current and prospective stakeholders to determine if they want to be involved with it.

Challenges and benefits of mission and vision statements in a constant climate change: Challenges actually depend on a constant climate change . Change of anything occurs because of need of the time. But in many cases people do not like to accept the change. In an organizational situation employees feel reluctance to adjust with the change. In an organizational situation employees feel reluctance to adjust with the change because they feel uncertainty about the changing situation. On that situation top management should take initiatives to implement the change.

Change is the rule will be among the required reading for executive leadership team as we continue to drive for dramatic business growth and value creation. Robert Parkey; Jr. President ,Texaco Natural Gas Steps involved in Change 1. Decide to Plan for Change: Awareness 2. Real vs. Perceived Need: Interest 3. Reason to Implement: Advantage 4. Mission of the Organization: Evaluation 5. Plan the Program: Trial 6. Review What Is Done Now: Observability 7. The Gap: Compatibility 8. Contingency: Pre-Adoption 9. Implementation: Adoption I. Decide to Plan for Change: Awareness . Key Administrators 2. Super Leader 3. Understand Elements of Change ?Flexible Environment ?Policy ?Philosophy ?Leadership II. Real vs Perceived Need: Interest 1. Identify the Recipient 2. Why have the program? ?Who wants the program? ?Who needs the program? 3. The Competition: Who Else Is Doing It? 4. Is the Program Really Needed? III. Understand Reason to Implement: Advantage 1. Value to the Organization 2. Political Issues Involved 3. Technology or Need Driven 4. Competition Driven for Competition’s Sake 5. Philosophy of the Program 6. Culture of the Organization Affects programs ?Political issues involved IV. Mission of the Organization: Evaluation 1. Does the Programming Fit the Organization’s ?Goals & Objectives ?Quality standards 2. How Will This Help the Organization? — If it won’t, don’t! 3. Driving Force to Market the Program? 4. Will it Make Money? 5. Will It Be Self Sufficient? 6. How Large Do We Want It to Become? 7. What Is the Return on the Investment? V. Plan the Program: Trial 1. Time – Take the Time to Plan 2. People – Faculty/Staff 3. Space, Facilities, Equipment 4. Production Capability 5. Money – Now & Later

VI. Review What Is Done Now: Observability 1. Will Distance Learning Duplicate Services? Classes? Staff? Departments? 2. Is the Organization Working Well In Training & Education? 3. Does the Organization Support Education & Training? Change? Technology? 4. Do We Have Enough People and Support to Add Change? 5. What Are the Organization’s Strengths? Weaknesses? VII. The Gap: Compatibility 1. How Far to Go to Have a Successful Program 2. Will the Organization Be Able to Change 3. Subtract the Difference Between…. Where We Want to Be – Where We Are Now = The Gap 4.

Can We Do It? VIII. Contingency: Pre-adoption 1. Trial & Pilot 2. Flexibility 3. Client Needs 4. Institutional Perceptions 5. Success vs. Failure: ?What happens if it won’t, doesn’t, or can’t? ?Is different? ?Is better, can, and does? IX. Implementation: Adoption 1. Lead People 2. Design Programming 3. Train in Production Techniques & Technology 4. Faculty Support 5. Dollar Support 6. On-going Growth 7. Continued Resources – Finance the Program 8. Plan for Growth 9. Plan for Change 10. Believe in the Program 11. Garnish Support Again and Again 12.

Evaluate the Program http://www. tecweb. orgeddevelhighsteps. html Conclusion Develop a PLC plan to ensure that all of the following occur within your mission and vision statements: •Communicate consistently, frequently, and through multiple channels, including speaking, writing, video, training, focus groups, bulletin boards, Intranets, and more about the change. •Communicate all that is known about the changes, as quickly as the information is available. (Make clear that your bias is toward instant communication, so some of the details may change at a later date.

Tell people that your other choice is to hold all communication until you are positive about the decisions. This is disastrous in effective change management. •Provide significant amounts of time for people to ask questions, request clarification, and provide input. If you have been part of a scenario in which a leader presented changes, on overhead transparencies, to a large group, and then fled, you know what bad news this is for change integration. •Clearly communicate the vision, the mission, and the objectives of the change management effort.

Help people to understand how these changes will affect them personally. (If you don’t help with this process, people will make up their own stories, usually more negative than the truth. ) •Recognize that true communication is a “conversation. ” It is two-way and real discussion must result. It cannot be just a presentation. •The change leaders or sponsors need to spend time conversing one-on-one or in small groups with the people who are expected to make the changes. •Communicate the reasons for the changes in such a way that people understand the context, the purpose, and the need.

Practitioners have called this: “building a memorable, conceptual framework,” and “creating a theoretical framework to underpin the change. ” •Provide answers to questions only if you know the answer. Leaders destroy their credibility when they provide incorrect information or appear to stumble or back-peddle, when providing an answer. It is much better to say you don’t know, and that you will try to find out. •Leaders need to listen. Avoid defensiveness, excuse-making, and answers that are given too quickly. Act with thoughtfulness. •Make leaders and change sponsors available, daily when possible, to mingle with others in the workplace. Hold interactive workshops and forums in which all employees can explore the changes together, while learning more. Use training as a form of interactive communication and as an opportunity for people to safely explore new behaviours and ideas about change and change management. All levels of the organization must participate in the same sessions. •Communication should be proactive. If the rumour mill is already in action, the organization has waited too long to communicate. •Provide opportunities for people to network with each other, both formally and informally, to share ideas about change and change management.

References • Thill J. V. , Courtland L. Bovee C. L. (2008) Excellence in Business Communication, (8th edn) Pearson International Edition. • •Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008),Effective Organisational Communication(3rd edn) FT Prentice Hall. •Susan M. Heathfield, Communication in Change Management. •http://www. sooperarticles. com/business-articles/management-articles/steps-involved-making-your-business-competitive-12778. html •http://www. hillandknowlton. co. uk/what/our-services/change-and-internal-communications •http://www. tecweb. orgeddevelhighsteps. html (2,228 words)